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Map of motorbike crashes and accidents in Victoria

According to the Transport Accident Commission, motorcycles represent almost 4% of the number of registered vehicles in Victoria, but account for 15% of all road deaths and 17% of hospitalised claims.

While fatalities are on the decline for motorcycle riders in Victoria, road trauma should not be accepted as inevitable. It’s the shared responsibility of all road users to be aware of the risks.

The map below details the number of accidents causing injury that involved motorcyclists in Victoria from 2013-2017.

Data from Data.Vic.gov.au under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International.
View a map of all motor vehicle accidents in Victoria.

In Victoria in 2016, 56 motorcyclists were killed on our roads. Of these:

  • All were male.
  • 71% of the accidents occurred in metro Victoria.
  • 53% were involved in crashes between the hours of 10am and 6pm.
  • 46% of lives lost were on roads with speed limits of 100km/h or more.
  • 27% were involved in single vehicle crashes.
  • 32% of lives lost were in head on or overtaking collisions.
  • 21% were involved in crashes with another vehicle at an intersection.

Below are some of the most common factors involved in motorcycle accidents in Australia:

  1. Excessive speed
  2. Alcohol and / or drug use
  3. Racing or skylarking
  4. Hitting items on the road such as animals
  5. Collisions with other road users
  6. Road hazards and infrastructure

As a motorcyclist, the best ways to avoid a motorcycle accident include being aware, paying attention to other road users, avoiding excessive speed, never driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol, and investing in defensive driving training.

See our motorcycle safety infographic for more information

Written by Shine Lawyers on . Last modified: March 15, 2018.

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  • Matthew wrote:

    “Lane splitting. This is when a motorcycle drives between the two lanes of stopped or slowly moving cars.”
    That’s “Filtering”, when the cars are travelling at less than 30kph.
    “Lane splitting” is when the cars are doing greater than 30kph – an important distinction, as filtering is legal now, lane splitting is not.

    • Shine Lawyers wrote:

      Thanks for the feedback Matthew, we’ve since updated our content. ~Steph

  • Damien wrote:

    Be interested to know how many accidents involved riders on mopeds or scooters wearing little protective gear.

  • Matt wrote:

    The problem with the whole excessive speed is that basically every crash has speed listed as a factor because if you were doing 1kmph it probably wouldnt of happened driver and rider training needs to be fixed on the roads its crazy that you more the 1 in 5 happen at an intersection

  • Haemisch wrote:

    Since the introduction of the MGLS statistics have dropped for learner and novice riders. Get all the facts before publishing the negative propaganda about motorcyclist. Modern cars are safer than they have ever been. Two modern cars can be involved in a major collision with as many as four occupants in each vehicle and the occupants can walk away unharmed because they are surrounded by safety features. A motorcyclists has none of the safety features the driver of a car has. There is no government safety rating on motorcycles. It makes no difference to what bike a motorcyclist was riding at the time of the collision. Old, new, scooter, powerful sports bike or heavy cruiser, gravity, inertia and the riding gear will ultimately ultimately determine the level of injury. A rider can get injured at 40 kph wearing all the safety gear. So when you research statistics, include the number of 4+ wheeled vehicles that end up in panel shops for repair and the insurance write offs, not just the TAC claims. Riders are on the outside. Drivers are inside strapped in and surrounded by safety features built into the vehicle.

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